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Tudor Period

Hampshire's History and the Tudor Period with the Reformation and Henry VIII's patronage much land and wealth would pass to the Tudor's chosen beneficiaries.

Tudor Period in Hampshire's History

The Tudor Period, from 1485-1603 left its mark on Hampshire, as it did in so many other parts of England, in the dissolution of its monasteries. The Reformation brought huge change. New landlords, important Hampshire families who became new men of the Reformation such as the Wriothesleys and Paulets benefited hugely from the gifts of dissolution. The old religion remained quite strong in Hampshire and its recusant families such as the Shelleys of Buriton and the Cottons of Warblington, some of the Tichbornes and Paulets came through the period fairly unscathed. On the flip side, the Marian persecutions in the reign of Mary, had little effect on Hampshire either.

 

Tudor Period

Wriothesley Memorial Titchfield

 

The fortunes of Portsmouth, Southampton and Winchester waxed and waned during the Tudor period

Portsmouth was established as a naval dockyard after King Henry VII built a dry dock there but Southampton's position as a mercantile trading port declined with the decline in foreign merchant ships. King Henry VIII built his famous south coast fortifications and from Southsea watched his ship, the Mary Rose sink.

Tudor Period

Tudor Rose on the Mary Rose Canon

So join us as we sample Hampshire life under the Tudors, there's plenty of intriguing connections to explore.

Tudor Period

Unusual Tudor window St Nicholas Brockenhurst

 

Merdon Castle

Merdon Castle

Between Standon and Hursley just off the A3090 sits Merdon Castle This little known ancient monument is now in private hands and so getting sight of it is tricky. If you drive along Castle Merdon Lane you can stop and take a look over the wall and you will see the earthworks on which this…

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Medieval shoes

Medieval Shoes in Selborne

Medieval shoes never look very comfortable but they are brilliantly evocative of a time long past The Medieval shoe in discussion is the one with excessively long pointed toes. They are called ‘Poulaines’ meaning ‘shoes in the Polish fashion’ since they were thought to have been fashionable in Krakow in the 15th century. The Poulaine…

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