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Interesting Buildings

Eling Tide Mill

Eling Toll House

Eling tidal mill is a rare mill, not just in Britain but in the world. There has been a mill on the site for at least a thousand years, the present building dates from about the 1780’s. It still mills flour and is set in the lovely area of Eling Quay.

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Robert Owen Pioneering Socialist

Robert Owen and Harmony Hall

Robert Owen was a pioneering socialist, who brought his ideas of Utopian living to the Hampshire countryside by building Harmony Hall near East Tytherley. Little remains now of the Hall, it was burnt down in the C20th but Robert Owen’s socialist ideas live on.

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The Andover Workhouse

The Andover Workhouse

The Andover workhouse scandal brought about the demise of the Poor Law Commission, set up in the 1830’s to find a solution to the growing number of por and destitute people in England.

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Corhampton Church and King Cnut

Corhampton Church

A possible link between Corhampton church and King Cnut The Anglo Saxon church is awash with historical gems and it’s interesting to consider some of the connections made between its architecture and artefacts and other events that occurred in its long history. Go to the northern side of the church and look at the blocked…

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Odiham Pest House

Odiham Pest House Odiham Hampshire

The church yard of All Saints Odiham contains a rare survivor from the past, a pest house. The Odiham pest house is a tiny single cell cottage where members of the community with infectious diseases could be isolated.

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Abbey House Winchester

Abbey House gates Winchester
This entry is part 4 of 6 in the series Winchester Historical Landmarks

Abbey House, built upon land once a gift to Queen Mary Tudor and now the residence of the Mayor of Winchester The site of Abbey House was once occupied by the Abbey of St Mary and St Edburga, formerly the Saxon Nunnaminster. When the abbey was dissolved in 1539, most of the buildings were destroyed.…

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Nunnaminster Winchester

Ruins of Nunnaminster Winchester

Nunnaminster in Winchester was the Saxon abbey founded in 903AD by King Alfred and his wife Ealhswith. It was a wooden structure re-built in stone and then enlarged by the Normans.

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Beaulieu Abbey

Beaulieu Abbey

Beaulieu Abbey, in the New Forest was founded by Cistercian monks on land gifted to them by King John in 1204. The ruins and the house are a historical gem that capture the essence of Hampshire history during the turbulent Medieval period.

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Bursledon Windmill

Bursledon Windmill

Bursledon windmill is Hampshire’s only working windmill and represents a time when agriculture depended upon local manufacturing. It fell into decline when new technology for milling overtook the old but somehow Bursledon Windmill managed to survive and is now a popular tourist attraction.

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Royal Victoria Hospital

Royal Victoria Hospital Netley

The Royal Victoria Hospital in Netley was built with Queen Victoria’s support to provide care to British military personnel whose sufferings at the Crimea War had been brought to her attention. The huge hospital on Southampton Water served it purpose for just over a hundred years.

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Netley Castle

Netley Castle and Abbey

Netley Castle faces out across Southampton Water, its back turned on nearby Netley Abbey and looking out for signs of a possible French invasion Netley Castle started life as the gatehouse to the Cistercian Netley Abbey. The early grounds of the abbey spilled outside of its present day boundaries and road, down to the shore…

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Netley Abbey

Netley Abbey Hampshire

Netley Abbey is the most beautiful historical site in Hampshire. It is the most complete C13th Cistercian monastery in southern England and quite stunning. It is free to visit, take a camera, it will not disappoint.

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Butser Ancient Farm

Butser Ancient Farm Hampshire

The Butser Ancient Farm experimental archaeology project is over forty years old and still developing new research into how ancient communities lived. It acts as both a tourist and educational attraction as well as a research site.

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Buckler’s Hard

Bucklers Hard Hampshire

Buckler’s Hard, a place that launched at least three of the warships commanded by Nelson at the Battle of Trafalgar The hamlet of Buckler’s Hard, with its two neat rows of brick terraced cottages running out to the Beaulieu River are all that remains today to remind us of the once famous shipyard that used…

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The Point Portsmouth

Portsmouth Harbour Hampshire

The Point Portsmouth consists of just a few acres around the camber in Old Portsmouth but is bursting with history and character at every step The Point is also known as the Spice Island, the origins of its name lost in the dim past. Maybe it referred to the smell of spices being unloaded or…

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Chesapeake Mill

Chesapeake Mill Wickham Hampshire

Chesapeake Mill in Wickham is a fine example of a building whose timbers were once creaking across the worlds oceans Outwardly Chesapeake Mill is a grand brick built building, standing tall and dominating the corner in which it sits. It is now an emporium of antique, brik- a- brak and craft units with a tea…

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Hurst Spit Lighthouse

Hurst Spit Castle

The Pristine Form of the Hurst Spit Lighthouse is just the last of a series of lights to guide mariners through this narrow part of the Solent Hurst Spit lighthouse cannot be accessed directly by car but a walk along the spit to Hurst Castle gives a lovely view of its slender form. A lighthouse…

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Bugle Street Southampton

Bugle St Old Southampton

Bugle Street Southampton has some wonderful old merchants houses It is not just the Tudor House or the Medieval Merchants House that are worth looking at in the area around St Michael’s Square in Old Southampton. Cast your eyes around many old merchants houses to get a full flavour of the area when  it fizzed…

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The Tudor House Southampton

Tudor House Southampton Hampshire

 The Tudor House Southampton The Tudor House is one of the oldest and most spendid, buildings in Southampton built in approximately 1495 when King Henry VII was on the thrown and was commissioning the world’s first dry dock in nearby Portsmouth. The site originally belonged to John Whytegod, a wealthy merchant and property owner, who,…

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