The House of Denmark in Hampshire’s History

The C10th was to be the last one of Anglo Saxon England. King Alfred’s reign set in motion a dynasty which, would create a united kingdom of England only to have it collapse. In the year 1000 AD a new wave of Viking raids took place and a Viking became King of England, the wondrously named, ¬†Swegn Forkbeard. The House of Denmark , so named because Forkbeard and his son who would eventually follow him, Canute, came from Denmark. Their reign was a little interrupted but was an interesting one in terms of Hampshire history.

Secrets of Winchester’s Mortuary Chests

Secrets of Winchester’s Mortuary Chests

The Winchester Cathedral mortuary boxes containing the remains of our earliest Saxon kings are being examined to see if the bones can be connected to King Cnut.

The Impact of the Vikings on Churches in Wessex

The Impact of the Vikings on Churches in Wessex

Hampshire and it’s neighbouring counties of Berkshire and Wiltshire were at the core of West Saxon Wessex when the Viking raids swept through. The emerging Christian churches were attacked and the fragile shoots of the new religion stamped upon.

Untangling the Early Church in Hampshire (Part 1)

Untangling the Early Church in Hampshire (Part 1)

Hampshire has a great number of early churches, a number of which still have vestiges of their Anglo Saxon origins peeping through the structure.

The Mysteries of Wymering Manor

The Mysteries of Wymering Manor

Wymering Manor in Portsmouth is one of Hampshire’s oldest and allegedly, most haunted houses. From the outside it presents a bit of a sorry state and it’s exterior belies it’s ancient past but it is a house full on intrigue and mystery.

St Hubert’s Church Idsworth

St Hubert’s Church Idsworth

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series South East Hampshire Churches

The Medieval wall paintings in the church of St Hubert, formerly St Peter, in Idsworth Hampshire are some of the most poignant Christian wall paintings to be seen. The chapel stands alone in a field, all that is left of an Anglo Saxon settlement, one of a number of lost Hampshire villages, after the spread of the black death throughout the county.

Vikings Move Against Wessex

Vikings Move Against Wessex

This entry is part 14 of 15 in the series Anglo Saxon Hampshire

Alfred held out against the Viking invasion and showed great skills in organizing his militia, so that when the opportunity to crush the Danish attack, he did so, decisively and coherently at the Battle of Edington

The ‘Bloody Heath’ and Cerdic

The ‘Bloody Heath’ and Cerdic

Charford in Hampshire is thought to have been the scene of a bloody battle that resulted in Cerdic and his son Cynric becoming the first kings of the Kingdom of Wessex.

East Meon and the Bishops of Winchester

East Meon and the Bishops of Winchester

The history of East Meon is closely connected with the Bishops of Winchester, whose influence in this ancient manor date back to pre- Norman times.